Why are the GOP’s top donors now worried about the 2020 presidential race?

The Republican Party is looking to boost its fundraising numbers in a bid to boost the fortunes of the party’s candidates in the coming presidential cycle, and some Republican leaders are worried that the party will fall short of the spending that could make it competitive in the general election.

Sources familiar with the discussions told The Hill that Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus, Vice President Mike Pence and top Republican donors are considering ways to boost their political fortunes after years of falling short of expectations.

The sources said Priebus, who has led the RNC for several years, is weighing whether to spend more than $1 billion on TV ads and online ads to boost his party’s chances of winning the White House in 2020.

He is also weighing whether he could invest in more infrastructure, including road construction, to boost turnout in the midterm elections and make the party competitive in November.

Sources say Priebus is also considering how to invest in other ways to help boost his GOP’s chances.

If the RNC’s fundraising efforts continue to falter, Priebus is considering a move to cut back on his spending to give the party more time to spend money and develop an infrastructure program.

Priebus has repeatedly told donors that he is serious about raising more money for his party.

He also said he was prepared to spend at least $100 million on TV advertising and online advertising in the next few weeks.

One GOP source said Priebus was considering spending more than that, and that the RNC was discussing a plan to spend about $5 million per month to help fund the party in the 2020 midterm elections.

Another GOP source also said Priebus is planning to spend $1 million per week for the next six months to help pay for television and online media.

While the GOP is likely to be outspent by Democratic rival Hillary Clinton and her allies, the RNC sources said the party would have to raise more money than it does now to match the spending of the Democratic Party.

The source said the RNC would be looking to raise between $5.5 and $7 million to be competitive in 2020 and that it was willing to spend that money to build a robust voter file.