How to spot when your child’s visual schedule is autistic

Posted February 23, 2018 12:14:18In a blog post published on February 23 at the Autism Speaks website, author and researcher Susan Neiman outlines four key signs your child might be exhibiting autism.

The first sign is the inability to recognize a visual pattern.

This may be due to difficulty reading a picture, or may be because the visual pattern isn’t clearly identifiable as the object to which it refers.

The second sign is difficulty with distinguishing colors, or a lack of interest in a particular color.

The third is a lack or inability to identify a pattern in a large number of colors, and the fourth is a persistent lack of preference for one color or pattern over another.

When the child is unable to recognize the object the pattern of the object, it’s time to check out their visual schedule.

If you notice a problem with their visual pattern, try again later.

If the child has trouble recognizing the object in front of them, the next thing to look for is whether the visual schedule matches the color of the color in front.

If the child’s color preference matches the pattern, they’re likely displaying autism spectrum disorder.

If they don’t, there are several other possible causes for the color mismatch.

If you see the child in the room, it may be that they have a limited visual range.

This is often due to the presence of other people in the home.

If this is the case, try checking in with the child for at least two hours a day.

This can include the time they spend staring at the screen, and if they are unable to engage in other activities.

A visual schedule may include at least three colors or more of different colors.

If one of the colors is different from the other colors, the child may be displaying autism.

Visual schedule can be difficult to diagnose, Neiman says.

If it’s not apparent, it could be that the child simply doesn’t have a strong preference for a particular pattern.

But if a pattern is present, then you may be able to rule out other possibilities, such as learning disabilities or attention deficit disorder.