How to stop visual discrimination and visual distortion in your work

Visual discrimination is the result of the inability of visual processing to process and categorize information in a way that does not produce an incorrect result.

When visual processing fails to find a match between the information in our environment and the information that we are looking for, we tend to produce more distracting or inaccurate results.

Visual distortion is the opposite.

This occurs when our perception of an object is distorted by our vision.

The distortion of an image is caused by our visual processing failing to take into account the details of the object in question, resulting in an incorrect impression.

The problem is that this distortion results in an inaccurate perception of what we are seeing.

The reason why we perceive an object in the first place is because our perceptual processing is biased by the fact that our brain is trained to detect shapes.

So, when we see something, our brain creates a mental image of what the object might look like and then uses that image to create a visual representation of the shape that we perceive.

If we are able to overcome this bias, we can reduce the amount of visual distortion that occurs when we perceive a new object.

One of the ways we can do this is to use visual cues in our work.

For example, if I’m working on a project, I might choose a visual cue such as a dot or a circle to indicate a visual object.

I might also choose a colour palette that I use to highlight certain areas of the image in order to make it easier for my visual processing skills to process the new object in a more efficient manner.

But, the real challenge comes when we encounter new information.

When I encounter a new piece of information, I start using the visual cues I’ve created in the past and use them to help me process the information.

For instance, when I read a newspaper article, I will use the colour palettes I created earlier to highlight different parts of the article and then, when the article is presented in print, I may use the dots and circles to highlight the important information in the paper.

As I read more about the information, these visual cues help me to understand more about what the new information is and then to interpret the new piece more effectively.

There are a number of other ways that visual cues can help us improve our work and our perception.

For the first time, it is possible to use this knowledge to solve visual discrimination problems.

This is because, in the human brain, our perceptual abilities are built using the same basic set of brain mechanisms that are used to recognize shapes.

However, we now know that the same mechanism also works in a computer system and it also allows us to solve other kinds of visual discrimination problem.

For more information on visual discrimination, please refer to our article on Visual Discrimination.