Data visualization tools and visual hallucinations

Visual release hallucinations (VR) are a subset of visual hallucinations that are based on visual images or sounds, rather than written text or images.

They’re typically triggered by sound, which is typically a musical note or a vocal cue.

They occur when a person experiences auditory hallucinations or auditory hallucinations triggered by visual images.

The auditory hallucinations can include sounds that appear to be coming from outside the body, as well as sounds that are not necessarily coming from the same location.

A person with visual release hallucinations may be able to visualize or hear the sounds, but not the images.

Visual release hallucinogens can be taken by the person with an elevated risk of VR, including people with PTSD.

People with VR can experience visual hallucinations in a variety of ways, including by looking at visual images, by listening to sound, by having visual hallucinations and/or visual imagery triggered by the use of visual release hallucinsogens, or by having auditory hallucinations and visual imagery trigger the use or perception of the visual imagery.

For people who have PTSD, these effects are sometimes called “visual hallucinations.”

In many cases, the auditory hallucinations are also accompanied by visual imagery, or visual hallucinations can be triggered by certain sounds or visual stimuli.

Visual Release Impaired Visual Release hallucinations are more common than other visual hallucinations.

The following table shows the number of reported cases of visual releases of people with a specific diagnosis, by diagnosis type, and by time.

In the next section, we discuss how visual release disorders are defined.